Nairobi (Kenya)

Nairobi, Kenya

WP1 - Vulnerability Assessment:

In Nairobi, Dakar and Mombasa a common research approach under WP1 focuses on the health impacts of a key everyday, human-induced primary hazard - namely poor solid waste management (SWM), and relevant associated secondary hazards, such as soil, groundwater and air pollution, flooding and fires. 

  • APHRC will draw on its in-depth expertise in areas of public health and epidemiology in resource poor urban informal settlements and draw extensively on existing datasets, including APHRC’s Nairobi Urban Health and Surveillance Systems and Nairobi Cross Sectional Slum Surveys to identify determining factors for the causes of morbidity and mortality amongst target groups comparing communities relative to their exposure to poor solid waste management. 

Primary data collection will include: 

key informant interviews, environmental assessments and GIS assisted mapping onto detailed city plans.

  • A further research project under WP1 in Nairobi and led by International Alert focuses on the interaction of conflict and environmental risks and their effects on community resilience and vulnerability in Kibera, Nairobi. The focus of the study is on conflict risk, associated with ethnic tensions (for instance between the Nubian community and others), land tenure and the history of the post-election violence. The research aims to identify these conflict risks and explore how they interact with other risks in Kibera, particularly flooding.
  • Research Methods include: qualitative field research in Kibera and analysis of findings from KDI’s Building Urban Flood Resilience project (2015-2016) in Kibera. 

This briefing outlines the development of community-led research to promote urban governance for resilience and how impactful partnerships can be created within a research programme.

Cities are at the centre stage of Africa’s pathway to prosperity, with the majority of its population expected to be living in urban areas within the next decade.

The past may reveal local patterns and triggers of urban risk, highlighting the importance of long-term exposure to everyday events and barriers to risk reduction.

Between 2016 and 2017, Arup carried out case study research to explore how large two infrastructure projects are creating, compounding or mitigating risk in Nairobi. The Thika Highway Improvement P

Kenya has developed various policy frameworks to guide the management of solid waste.

Kenya has developed various policy frameworks to guide the management of solid waste.

Globally, urbanisation is associated with the increased generation of solid waste. City authorities are struggling to provide adequate waste management services,

Community-based organisation and action can contribute greatly to disaster risk reduction, and interlinked to this, to building resilience to the impacts of climate change.

Climate change continues to amplify vulnerability in low-income communities across Nairobi, with many urban livelihoods at great risk to the impacts of flooding.

Author(s): 

Patrick Tarbuck

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