Nairobi (Kenya)

Nairobi, Kenya

WP1 - Vulnerability Assessment:

In Nairobi, Dakar and Mombasa a common research approach under WP1 focuses on the health impacts of a key everyday, human-induced primary hazard - namely poor solid waste management (SWM), and relevant associated secondary hazards, such as soil, groundwater and air pollution, flooding and fires. 

  • APHRC will draw on its in-depth expertise in areas of public health and epidemiology in resource poor urban informal settlements and draw extensively on existing datasets, including APHRC’s Nairobi Urban Health and Surveillance Systems and Nairobi Cross Sectional Slum Surveys to identify determining factors for the causes of morbidity and mortality amongst target groups comparing communities relative to their exposure to poor solid waste management. 

Primary data collection will include: 

key informant interviews, environmental assessments and GIS assisted mapping onto detailed city plans.

  • A further research project under WP1 in Nairobi and led by International Alert focuses on the interaction of conflict and environmental risks and their effects on community resilience and vulnerability in Kibera, Nairobi. The focus of the study is on conflict risk, associated with ethnic tensions (for instance between the Nubian community and others), land tenure and the history of the post-election violence. The research aims to identify these conflict risks and explore how they interact with other risks in Kibera, particularly flooding.
  • Research Methods include: qualitative field research in Kibera and analysis of findings from KDI’s Building Urban Flood Resilience project (2015-2016) in Kibera. 

This chapter is a counterpoint to those in the rest of this volume that treat Africa’s large cities.

(44p)

Author(s): 

Ben Wisner, Mark Pelling, Adolfo Mascarenhas, Ailsa Holloway, Babacar Ndong, Papa Faye, Jesse Ribot, and David Simon

Populations and assets, in African cities, small and large, are among the most vulnerable to disaster risk globally. Climate change and demographic shifts add urgency and uncertainty.

(0p)

Author(s): 

Ibidun Adelekan, Cassidy Johnson, Mtafu Manda, et al

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